Category Archives: Blog

Whose Dog is That Sniffing Around my House?

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to take a case out of Florida which asks the question: Does a police dog’s sniff outside a house give officers the right to get a search warrant for illegal drugs, or is the sniff an unconstitutional search? On the morning of Dec. 5, 2006, Miami-Dade police detectives and U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agents set up surveillance outside a house south of the city after getting an anonymous tip that it might contain a marijuana grow operation. The cops brought Franky, a K-9 drug dog . The dog quickly detected the odor of pot at the base of the front door and sat down as he was trained to do. That sniff was used to get a search warrant from a judge. The house was searched and its lone occupant, Joelis Jardines, was arrested for drug possession after trying to escape out the back door. Officers pulled 179 live marijuana plants from the house, with an estimated street value of more than $700,000. The 4th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution forbids government searches of persons and property without probable cause. The U.S. Supreme Court has approved drug dog sniffs in several other major cases. Two of those involved

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Rates of Female DUI Increase throughout the Last Decade

A recent study published by The Century Council and the Traffic Injury Research Foundation shows that the number of females arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol has increased 36% over a decade. The report, which will be available in full later this month, states that while men are often seen as the primary offenders in drunk driving cases, the number of women involved has increased steadily since 1980 and was up 29% from 1997 to 2007. Researchers examining the phenomenon offer various explanations for this spike in female DUI statistics. One theory is that more women are drinking and then driving than in past years. Some researchers believe that the spike in women’s arrests is due to changes in the legal system including fewer male arrests and changes to the DUI law enforcement policy that bring more attention to women whose blood alcohol content levels are more affected by alcohol consumption. The study indicated,

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Designed to Fail? MR GA DUI Advises Against Submitting to Field Sobriety Tests

If you own a MR GA DUI koozie or read his blog, you’ve probably heard that he suggests not submitting to field sobriety tests when stopped by the police for driving under the influence. While experienced DUI attorney Mickey Roberts has been advising clients and Georgia drivers not to submit to field sobriety tests for years, an investigative reporter for Atlanta’s Channel 2 Action News, Richard Belcher, further solidified Robert’s advice in a recent news story. Belcher spoke with police officers, as well as Dr. Spurgeon Cole, a retired psychology professor from Clemson University, who has been studying field sobriety tests since the 1980s shortly after the tests were first instituted. Cole told the Channel 2 reporter that when these tests were designed, police incorrectly identified 47% of the drivers as intoxicated during trials. However,

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4 Simple Rules Explained: Rule 3

mrgaduiThe 3rd Simple rule is not so simple.  Should you take the State blood, breath, or urine test after you are arrested for DUI? The answer is: it depends. Under Georgia’s Implied Consent law, once you are arrested for DUI, you must submit to the officer’s request for a test of your blood, breath, urine,  or other bodily substance.  If you don’t, you face having your license suspended for a year with no work or school permit available.  After you submit to the officer’s test(s), you are then entitled to independent tests of your blood, breath, urine or other bodily substance.

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Drivers Who Use Marijuana Reportedly Twice as Likely to have Accidents

Mickey Roberts, MRGADUI attorneyWhen most people think of DUI, they think about driving under the influence of alcohol. However, driving under the influence of illegal drugs is also driving under the influence. Marijuana is the most commonly detected drug in drivers, but whether or not marijuana causes an increased number of accidents remains a question. A recent study from Columbia University found that drivers who use marijuana are more than twice as likely to be involved in car accidents as those who do not. Using a meta-analysis of nine epidemiologic studies, the researchers found that the risk of an accident increases in people with a concentration of marijuana-produced compounds found by chemical test. Furthermore, the risk of a crash also increases with self-reported marijuana-users. In fact, eight out of nine of the studies determined that the risk of an accident significantly increases among drivers who use marijuana. This research is likely to cause debates about driver’s rights and medical marijuana in states that allow it. In Georgia, however,

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The above information is intended to help educate members of the Georgia motoring public as to their rights under the law and to assist presumptively innocent citizens in properly asserting those rights. Information within this site should not be misconstrued as legal advice.
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