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Category: Teen Drivers

Teen Driving Under Your Influence

Recent studies show that young drivers make up the highest percentage of drivers involved in motor vehicle crashes:  the leading cause of death for U.S. teens. According to a 2010 study by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 187,000 drivers between the ages of 15 and 20 were injured in motor vehicle crashes and an additional 1,963 drivers were killed. Though, the most troubling fact is that most teenage car crashes are 100 percent preventable.

Because of driving inexperience and unsafe driving habits, teenage drivers are more prone to engage in reckless or distracted driving. Statistics show they are more likely to speed, neglect seatbelts, text, and even drink while driving. They are also unable to recognize dangerous situations or poor road conditions where these habits can contribute to serious injuries – or even death.

As a parent, it’s imperative to discuss safe driving behavior and stress these types of consequences. Here are a few topics you should be sure to discuss with your teen:

1. Cell phone use- Regardless of age or experience, cell phone use is always dangerous while driving. Talking on the phone and texting while driving are both extremely distracting for any driver because it interferes with keeping focus on the road. Teens should consider turning their cell phones off, or even storing it somewhere out of reach while they drive to avoid the temptation.

2. Limiting number of passengers- Like cell phones, friends can also be distracting for any teen driver. Statistics show that teen drivers are more likely to engage in risky driving habits with peers than when they’re alone. More passengers in a vehicle heighten the risk of distraction.

3. Seat belt use- This is something all drivers should do, not just teens. Seatbelts are the single most effective tool for saving lives and preventing injuries. Seat belts can make the difference between life and death.

4. Substance abuse- No substance abuse should be tolerated, especially for underage teens. Any amount of alcohol for an individual under 21 raises their risk of receiving a DUI in addition to jeopardizing lives. You should also discuss the risks of being a passenger in a vehicle with a driver who has been drinking or using other illegal substances.

5. Reviewing state driving laws- Discuss curfew times set by the state and the minimum number of practice hours required before getting a driver’s license. Ensure your teen fulfills all requirements and sets a foundation for safe driving. In addition to the state of Georgia’s driving laws, you should also discuss your expectations and restrictions of their driving privileges.

A parent will always worry about their teen hitting the roads for the first time, but educating them about safe habits, along with the consequences and rules of driving will help reduce the chances of an accident. Check out my website for more information on driving issues and DUI help and be sure to connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Driving Drunk Not Worth the Risk on Graduation Night

me georgia dui mickey robertsAt the age of 18, graduating from high school is usually the biggest accomplishment of a teens’ life up to that point, and prior to 18, getting a driver’s license is typically a teen’s biggest feat. Imagine you are graduating from high school. Completing thirteen years of school makes you feel carefree and eager to start the next phase of life, and your younger classmates follow your lead: taking advantage of every opportunity to party. Now, imagine graduation night: the ceremony concludes, you and your classmates proceed to the after party where there is alcohol.   There is so much to celebrate, and so much excitement about what the future holds.  The only problem with this picture is that you still have that teenage mindset that you’re invincible. When the end of the night comes, you become more concerned with meeting curfew than protecting yourself and others from the dangers of driving under the influence. You consider calling your parents for a ride home, but you’re too afraid to admit to them that you have been drinking. Your best friend is facing the same dilemma, but you both decide that you’ll be fine—you live just down the road. It’s the morning after graduation and the greatest party of your life. You pick up the phone to call you best friend to discuss last nights’ events. No answer.

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57% of Teens Say they Text while Driving

According to a recent poll by State Farm, teen drivers say they are nervous about being in a car crash, yet 57% say they still text while driving.  The poll comes in a month, October, which historically has been the deadliest for teen drivers.

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Hey Teen Drivers: Want to Keep your License? Don’t Do This!

If you are a driver under the age of 18, you need to know that is is very easy for you to lose your driving privilege. Here are 5 ways:

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Teen Driving Case Success

Mickey, Just wanted to say thank you again for everything you have done for JA on this case.  What you worked out for him is unbelievable, considering he admitted to the possession charge.  I woke up this morning relieved knowing that this issue has come to some resolve. Now JA can move on with his life. Things for him are looking brighter. He was accepted at Kennesaw State University for spring 2011 semester and will be transferring from Perimeter.  He will be completing his education there and graduate next year with a business degree. Thank you again for all you have done. Sincerely, L. A. To learn more about Attorney Mickey Roberts (MRGADUI) and the legal services he offers to teen drivers visit his website, read his blog, or follow him on Facebook.

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Disclaimer

The above information is intended to help educate members of the Georgia motoring public as to their rights under the law and to assist presumptively innocent citizens in properly asserting those rights. Information within this site should not be misconstrued as legal advice.
Teen Drivers