Tag Archives: DUI Atlanta

2014: A Year in Review with Mickey Roberts, P.C.

December is often a time when we find ourselves in a sort of hibernation mode, confining ourselves more indoors and having more time to reflect on the passing year. As we head into 2015 I myself took some time to reflect and I am thankful: 2014 was a good year for my practice. Of the 62 cases closed this year, to date, of those were “DUI cases won”, while 16 cases resulted in guilty pleas; there were no guilty verdicts this year. I was geared up to go to trial for many of my cases but as circumstance would have it, it never came to that for various reasons including several cases being resolved without the need of a judge or jury!
There were several highlights that stick out in my mind, but I would like to share just a few with you:

Case of Year: The case of the year started out as a nasty case. My client was originally charged with DUI, fleeing, obstruction, reckless driving, and numerous other minor traffic offenses. He was stopped by Ga. State Patrol, forcibly pulled from his car and tasered. His shoulder was torn from its socket when officers strongly pulled him from the ground. Using the State Troopers reports and videos against them, I was able to obtain a dismissal on all counts, EXCEPT a no contest plea to failure to maintain lane.

This case, along with the more famous recent cases involving police brutality, shows the need for every police encounter to be videotaped, both for the citizen’s protection as well as that of the police officer.

Restriction/Expungements: I had 4 clients whose arrest records were restricted from public access after I filed actions under the new restriction law. If you have been charged and fingerprinted for any reason in the past, I will look into your case at no charge to see if you are eligible for restriction.

Drug Search Cases: I also handle drug possession cases and in 2014, I had 2 cases where a felony drug charge was dismissed because the search was illegal.

As I enter my 35th year of law practice, I look forward to continuing to aggressively defend your traffic law cases. Looking ahead to 2015, I am excited to begin taking on personal injury claims again and providing even more legal representation to clients. Be on the lookout for my new website, www.mickeyroberts.com, where I will be discussing additional traffic law topics coming in 2015!!

Without you entrusting me to help with your legal concerns, my practice would not be possible and for that, I am eternally grateful. Thank you for your continued support and here’s to another great year. I wish each and every one of you a very happy and prosperous New Year!

How Motions Can Win a DUI Case

There are many ways of winning a DUI case, and one way is to fight the case with “motions”. Motions are pleadings filed with the court asking it to throw out the case entirely or limit evidence that the State can use against the defendant.

The most common motion I use is called a Motion to Suppress.  This motion serves 3 purposes. First, it could possibly win the entire case, such as when the court rules the stop illegal. Second, it allows me to cross examine the cop to see if he/she can actually articulate why the defendant was arrested for DUI, whether they followed their training, and so forth. This is especially important in cases where there is no video of the arrest. I can cross examine the officer and many times show the State that the officer did not follow basic operating procedures for a DUI arrest, or doesn’t make a good witness.  Finally, sometimes the officer fails to appear for the hearing and the case gets thrown out.

One of my most recent cases shows the importance of motions: my client was stopped for weaving, supposedly failed all of the field sobriety tests, and registered a BAC (blood alcohol content) of .08 on the breath test. At the motions hearing, the officer was unable to remember or articulate my client’s physical appearance, could not articulate how he administered the field tests, and most importantly, NEVER testified that he read the implied consent warning (the warning needed as a prerequisite BEFORE admission of any State breath test). As a result the .08 was excluded from evidence. After the hearing, the State approached me and offered a dismissal of the DUI in return for a plea to reckless driving. My client readily accepted the reduced charge, and the case was over without the further expense of a jury trial for my client.

Motions are an important tool in aggressively defending DUIs, and any good DUI attorney should use motions on most DUI cases.  To learn more about the DUI defense and other traffic related services I offer visit my website and continue to read by blog.  Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter for access to the latest traffic offense news and updates.

Full Disclosure? Not for Georgia Breath Tests

Many of our government officials love the term “full disclosure” these days. Another word they like to use is “transparency”. Yet, the Georgia  Supreme Court doesn’t believe in transparency or full disclosure when it comes to breath tests. Take the recent case of Padidham v. State, decided May 7, 2012.

Let me set the scene. In Georgia, when you are arrested for DUI, the officer reads you the Implied Consent Warning (ICW), where he basically informs you that “Georgia law requires you to submit to a test of blood, breath, urine or other bodily substance to determine if you are under the influence of alcohol, but you can refuse to take such test(s). The refusal can be used against you in court, and that if you do take the test(s), you are entitled to additional independent tests of your choosing.”

Logic would tell us that it would help to know the results of the “State” test BEFORE deciding whether to get an independent test or not. For instance, if the State breath test showed a blood alcohol content of .08, .09, or something close to the limit, you might want to ask for a blood test or another type of test.

It would be very easy for the police to let you know your results immediately after submitting to a breath test as the machine prints out copies of the results immediately after you blow into the machine. However in Padidham, our Georgia Supreme Court holds that ALL an officer needs to do is inform you of your right to an independent test. The police do NOT need to tell you your actual test results. Once again this brings to mind the saying, “good enough for government work.”

To learn more about DUI and traffic violation defense, read our blog and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Why You Should Not Trust Georgia’s Breath Test Machine

When a person is arrested for DUI in Georgia, suspected of being under the influence of alcohol, most of the time the police will request that the person go to the jail or police station and submit to a “State chemical test of your breath.” It is this “breath test” that is used to convict that person of DUI, simply for having blood alcohol content (BAC) of over .08 grams.

Georgia uses a breath test machine manufactured by CMI, a company out of Kentucky. The machine contains many parts, and operates through an Infrared device used to take a breath sample from a suspect and convert it into an amount of alcohol in the person’s blood. The machine is a computer and operates by using a “source code” as all computers operate. There are many reasons why we should not trust the accuracy of Georgia’s breath machine. Here a just a few:

1. The machine is only inspected by a State employee once every 3 months; it is not inspected before and after every individual test. Therefore, even if the machine is deemed to be working properly, it can only be argued correctly that it was working that day, with only the inspector present.

2. During the “inspection”, the tester never actually opens up the machine to check to see if the electronic components are working properly.

3. The inspector does run a known alcohol solution through the machine. If the machine prints out a reading that is close to the actual alcohol amount, the machine is deemed to be working that day.

4. The alcohol control solution is in no way similar to an actual human sample. It does not take into account how a person with asthma, allergies, braces, gastric reflux, bridgework, or a fever would blow.

5. The inspector runs two test samples, if the two test results are within 25% of each other the machine is deemed to be working properly!

  There are many other reasons why you should not trust the breath test machine, but if you just consider the way Georgia inspects these machines to “verify” that they are working properly, ask yourself the following:

a. Would you allow your CPA to prepare a federal tax return with a 25% potential disparity?

b. Would you pay a lasik surgeon to fix your vision, and accept as “good enough for medical purposes” a CORRECTION that was OFF by these + and – ranges?

c. Would you book a flight on an airline with these variable percentages on their altimeters (the device that estimates the distance between the ground and the wheels at “touch down” on the runway)?

While these scenarios may seem far-fetched, they demonstrate the importance of only seeking the advice of an experienced Georgia DUI attorney if charged with DUI. To learn more about DUI and traffic violation defense, read our blog and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Radar Speed Detection Reinstituted in Gwinnett as Traffic Fatalities Jump

Have you recently noticed more police out in Gwinnett County using radar guns to catch speeders? In January 2011, only one year after the state of Georgia instituted the super speeder law, the option for Gwinnett County police and many city police in Gwinnett to use laser and radar speed detection was revoked due to an unresolved conflict between the county and city governments.

Although Georgia State Patrol could still use radar and laser detection to track drivers’ speed and Gwinnett police were able to catch speeders by pacing drivers, this revocation surely affected the number of speeding citations issued. According to an article in the Atlanta Journal Constitution, Gwinnett County police alone issued 29,000 speeding citations in 2010, and three-fourths of these citations were determined through the help of laser and radar gun detection.

In February 2012, the conflict was finally resolved and radar guns were returned to Gwinnett police. The police influenced by the dispute reported they operated just fine without the radars, but were definitely glad to have them back. They believe drivers are more likely to slow down if they know police are on the roads clocking their speed. With recent car accidents earlier this month resulting in three traffic fatalities over the span of five days in Gwinnett, you can probably expect to see even more police on the road.

On Friday, April 6th, a box truck crashed into the rear of a Nissan Altima sending both vehicles into a pickup truck and a minivan on I-985 S under Buford Drive. The driver and passenger of the Nissan died on impact. The other individuals involved suffered minor injuries. Police determined speed and alcohol were not factors in this accident, but the box truck driver was charged with two counts of second degree vehicular homicide. Second degree vehicular homicide is a misdemeanor resulting in a maximum sentence of 12 months, but first degree vehicular homicide is a felony and can result in 3 to 15 years in prison and license suspension.

The other traffic fatality in Gwinnett occurred April 10th at the intersection of Lawrenceville-Suwanee Road and Sugarloaf Parkway when a driver turned left in front of another driver as the stop light turned from green to yellow. The driver who was struck on the right side of his vehicle died at the scene. This incident is still under investigation to determine right of way and if speed was a factor, but driving while under the influence of alcohol did not seem to be a factor.

A leading Atlanta DUI defense lawyer, Mickey Roberts has seen many lives take an unfortunate turn due to drunk driving and vehicular homicide charges. He urges driver’s to drive carefully. Whether you drive carefully to avoid a speeding ticket or to prevent harm to yourself and other drivers, it’s important to be cautious as one bad decision can result in harsh consequences. If you have been arrested for DUI or other traffic violations, contact MrGaDUI today. Be sure to visit his website to learn more about driver’s rights, and connect with him on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ if you haven’t already.

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Disclaimer

The above information is intended to help educate members of the Georgia motoring public as to their rights under the law and to assist presumptively innocent citizens in properly asserting those rights. Information within this site should not be misconstrued as legal advice.
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