Tag Archives: georgia license suspension

New Changes in Law as a result of SB100

Georgia SB 100, which was passed in this year’s legislative session, changes several laws which previously had provided mandatory license suspensions.  In particular, the offense of a minor in possession of alcohol and the offense of possession of drugs NO LONGER CARRY MANDATORY LICENSE SUSPENSIONS if they are not involved in a DUI.

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While these offenses no longer carry mandatory suspensions and will not be reported to the Department of Driver Services (DDS), it is important to note that they still remain on a person’s arrest record if the person was arrested and fingerprinted. As a result, it’s still important to hire an attorney to make sure that the correct plea is entered so the arrest record can be restricted.

Here is a summary of the changes:

  1. 3-3-23.1 Minor in Possession of Alcohol: Deletes paragraph 3; no longer results in driver’s license suspension. Also deletes the suspension under 40-5-57.1(a) relating to suspension for under age possession of alcohol.
  2. 40-5-22(d) allows DDS to issue limited permit under 40-5-64 if license has been suspended due to suspension in another state, if otherwise eligible for such a limited permit.
  3. No mandatory suspension for use of fraudulent or fictitious license under 40-5-54 (a)(6); or any felony violation of Article I, Chapter 9, Title 16,  if such offense is related to an identification document as defined in 16-9-4.
  4. No suspension for drug convictions under 40-5-75 ; still suspended for DUI Drugs, although eligible for limited permit IF in Drug Court Program.
  5. No more license suspensions under 40-5-57.2(which is repealed), for conviction of driving off without paying for gas, 40-6-255.

SB 100 is just one example of how Georgia’s laws are constantly changing, and why it’s crucial to work with a traffic lawyer who specializes in your area of need and who stays up-to-date with all the new laws, decisions, and precedents while understanding the impact they have on your case. To discuss your case and how I may be able to help, schedule a consultation with me, Mickey G. Roberts.

The Facts About Georgia Driver’s License Reinstatement After Second DUI

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One of the reasons it’s so important for anyone charged with Driving Under the Influence (DUI) to hire an experienced traffic attorney is because your first DUI conviction will amplify the consequences of any future DUIs. A second DUI conviction not only carries heftier penalties than a first DUI, but also involves a complex process for getting your driver’s license reinstated. There is a lot of incorrect information out there, so here is the truth about license reinstatement after a second DUI conviction within a five-year period:

  • There is a hard suspension for four months after the plea. (This means absolutely NO driving!)
  • After four months, you may be able to get a limited permit to drive to work or school, which is valid for the next twelve months.  HOWEVER, you must first prove to the Georgia Department of Driver Services (DDS):
    • You have completed the twenty-hour Risk Reduction Class (DUI School).
    • You have completed the Alcohol and Drug Evaluation.
    • You have an Ignition Interlock Device (IID) on any car you drive, which requires you to blow into the device and prevents the car from starting if alcohol is detected.
  • After those twelve months, you may be able to get a limited permit for an additional two months.
  • Finally, after eighteen months of suspension, you can get your license reinstated by proving to the Georgia DDS:
    • You have completed DUI School.
    • You have completed a substance abuse program if it was recommended based on your Alcohol and Drug Evaluation. If no substance abuse program was recommended, you MUST receive a waiver from the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD).
    • You have had an IID for one year, unless waived by the Court for financial hardship.
    • You have paid a $210 reinstatement fee.

** Please note: I get many calls from folks wanting to seek the financial hardship waiver for the IID, but there are a few important factors to consider. First, it is very rare for a judge to order a waiver. Second, if you do receive a waiver for the IID, you are NOT eligible for any limited permit, meaning you would have a hard suspension for the full eighteen months!

Because driver’s license reinstatement laws are complex, it is wise to hire an experienced, knowledgeable DUI lawyer to help guide you through the process. To begin discussing your case, call Mickey Roberts at 770-923-4948 for more information. Or, to stay up-to-date on the latest DUI and traffic law news, follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

So You Got a Ticket Out of State: What You Need to Know

Summertime usually means traveling to the beach or mountains or lake. If you are planning on driving out of the state this summer, here are some scenarios to think about:

  1. Your teenager gets an out-of-state speeding ticket in Gulfshores, Alabama. How does that affect his/her license in GA?

If the speed is high enough that it would suspend the license in Georgia, then the Georgia license will eventually be suspended. If the offense is one that would suspend the license in Alabama, then the Georgia license will also eventually be suspended, and your teen will have to reinstate driving privileges in Alabama BEFORE getting their Georgia license reinstated.

  1. You get a DUI in Florida, and you have a Georgia license.

If you are convicted of Driving Under the Influence (DUI) in Florida, your Georgia license will be suspended. You will NOT be able to get a limited permit to drive to work, and you will only be able to get license reinstatement in Georgia once you have satisfied Florida’s reinstatement provisions.

  1. You receive a ticket out of state which can suspend a driver’s license either in the other state or Georgia.

Your Georgia license will be suspended and you will not be able to get Georgia license reinstatement until you have satisfied all the issuing state’s reinstatement procedures. For some reason, many folks think that an out of state ticket has no bearing on their GA license. Unfortunately, this is not accurate. Therefore, you should call or email me, Mickey Roberts, PC, if you or your family member receives a ticket out of state.

Georgia Driver’s License: Right or Privilege?

There’s nothing quite like the feeling of driving a car for the first time by yourself as a teenage driver: you’ve completed numerous hours of driver’s ed., passed the written test and aced the driving portion – congratulations, you’re a licensed Georgia driver!  What seems like a rite of passage for individuals over 16 year of age is considered a “driver’s privilege” in the eyes of the law when licenses are issued.  This means that what the State giveth, it can also taketh, and yes, they will suspend your license for a number of reasons.  I would like to share with you five examples (of course the list isn’t limited to these five) of such reasons that can lead to a Georgia license suspension:

    Georgia Drivers License Right or Privilege
  1. DUI: driving under the influence (DUI) is one of Georgia’s most common traffic offenses.  This means that if you are pulled over by a cop, consent to field sobriety tests , and consent to a breath test that show your blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is over .08 grams (.02 for under 21 drivers), then you can be convicted of DUI and your license suspended for a predetermined period of time.
  2. Too many points on your driving record: certain traffic convictions carry point values.  For instance speeding ranges from 2-6 points, depending on your speed, while unlawfully passing a school bus is 6 points.  If you accumulate a certain total of points in a short period of time (it’s dependent on your age and point value assigned to a specific conviction), then your license can be suspended.
  3. Hit & run: this refers to hitting another vehicle and driving away before the accident has been reported.  This is considered a serious infraction as it implies that you consciously chose to drive off and as a result, hit and runs are considered a mandatory suspendable offense.
  4. Failure to pay child support: if you have been mandated by the courts to pay child support and fail to do so, your name is added to a state-wide certified list of all persons in violation (this list is updated monthly).  If you have accumulated over 60 days’ worth of not paying then a licensing agency/department has the right to withhold your license until payment is made.
  5. School attendance: a teenage driver under the age of 18 can have their license suspended for several reasons including, dropping out of school without graduating, having 10 or more unexcused absences in an academic year or pleading guilty to a number of offenses (such as drug or weapon possession, causing bodily harm to students/teachers, etc.).  Conduct infractions can lead to a one-year suspension or until the minor has turned 18.

As an experienced traffic and DUI lawyer, I not only defend people who have had their license suspended because of traffic offenses but I also help get license suspensions revoked.  Give me a call or contact MrGaDUI today if you have recently had your Georgia license suspended.  For more on the latest updates in DUI or traffic law, stay connected with me through my Mickey Roberts, P.C. Facebook, Twitter or Google+ page.

Vehicular Homicide Continued: Misdemeanor, Feticide, & Serious Injury Crashes

Last month, I filled you in on the ins and outs of felony vehicular homicide. To recap, determining felony vehicular homicide depends largely on the traffic violations committed, including reckless driving, DUI, fleeing/eluding, and leaving the scene of the accident. Generally, if found guilty of felony vehicular homicide in Georgia, you can expect a punishment of 3 to 15 years in prison, though habitual violators can face up to 20 years.

As a seasoned traffic and DUI lawyer in Georgia, I have experience in defending cases involving other facets of vehicular homicide outside of felony, including misdemeanor, feticide, and serious injury crashes. All of these classifications have varying implications, but all involve a driver’s actions as the proximate cause of death or cause of serious injury. Vehicular homicide in the 2nd Degree is known as a misdemeanor. In Georgia, any person who causes the death of another person as a result of traffic violations other than the felony predicate offenses commits this offense.

For example, if you were to run a red light, crash into another car, and cause the death of another person, it would be classified as vehicular homicide in the 2nd Degree.  To be found guilty of misdemeanor vehicular homicide, the judge or jury is required to find that the person committed a traffic offense other than the felony vehicular homicide predicate offenses. Subsequently, it must be found that the person’s unlawful acts were the proximate cause of death. For this offense, you can be sentenced to a maximum of 12 months.

Another aspect of vehicular homicide is feticide by vehicle. The elements and punishment for felony feticide by vehicle are the same as felony vehicular homicide, with the same rule applying to misdemeanor vehicular homicide. Feticide by vehicle is defined as causing the death of an unborn child, at any stage of development that is carried in the womb, within a car crash.

Lastly, any person who brings about serious injury to another person as a result of reckless driving or DUI commits the offense of serious injury by vehicle. “Serious injury” is defined as “depriving a person of a member of his body, by rendering a member of his body useless, by seriously disfiguring his body or a member thereof, or by causing organic brain damage, which renders the body or any member thereof useless.” In order to be found guilty of serious injury by vehicle, the judge or jury must find that the person committed either reckless driving or DUI. Subsequently, they must find that the person’s unlawful acts were the proximate cause of serious injury. This offense is a felony that comes with a sentence from one to 15 years in prison. If convicted of serious injury by vehicle, the person will face 3 years of driver’s license suspension, no work permit available.

Navigating the various facets of vehicular homicide and serious injury crashes can be daunting and often times confusing. If you find yourself in any of the situations described, I urge you to contact a professional to aid in your case. To contact a reputable lawyer in Georgia, contact me, Mickey Roberts. Be sure to follow me on FacebookTwitter, and Google+ for traffic law updates and news.

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The above information is intended to help educate members of the Georgia motoring public as to their rights under the law and to assist presumptively innocent citizens in properly asserting those rights. Information within this site should not be misconstrued as legal advice.
georgia license suspension