Tag Archives: Georgia traffic lawyer

Is It a Crime to Eat While Driving?

You’ve probably heard it said many times that the law is open to interpretation, and that’s very true. In fact, if everything were black and white, most of our judicial system would be unnecessary. But just how much of the law is left up to interpretation? That’s the question on everyone’s mind when it comes to one recent news story.

Alabama man Madison Turner picked up a hamburger and was eating it on the way to his next destination when he was stopped by a Cobb County police officer. The officer had observed him eating while driving, and as a result, he issued Turner a citation. While the court date at which Mr. Turner can challenge the citation is not until February 3rd, it has left Georgia drivers with many questions: is there really a law against eating while driving? Am I at risk for a citation every time I need to eat lunch on the run? As a Georgia traffic lawyer, in the video below I address your questions and explain the circumstances of the law that Mr. Turner is accused of violating.

As this case demonstrates, there are many circumstances that can affect whether a law (or the spirit of a law) was actually broken. Fortunately, you don’t have to figure it out on your own. My many years of legal experience in various local court systems have equipped me to understand the intricacies of the distracted driving law and other Georgia traffic laws, and to fight for the rights of Georgia drivers. For more intriguing cases and updates to traffic laws, follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Why the Georgia State Patrol is Asking You to Speed Up (No, Really!)

“But officer, I was going the speed limit!”

Since July 2014, this has likely been the sentiment echoing through the ears of many Georgia State Patrol officers—but not for the reason you’d expect. While many speeders wrongfully use this excuse while going well over the speed limit, it could now be due to getting pulled over due to the new “slowpoke” law.

The law was passed by state legislature in efforts to reduce the amount of drivers who obstruct the flow of traffic in the passing lane.  By doing so, officers claim to decrease the possibility of “road rage” and accidents associated with slow drivers by moving them out of the left lane away from fast moving traffic and even speeders likely to be clocked by an officer’s radar gun.

If weather or traffic conditions make it necessary to stay in the left lane or you must be in the passing lane to exit the roadway or turn left, you’ll likely be excused from having to move out of the fast lane.

As of November 2014, the Georgia State Patrol has issued well over 100 citations. Officers report that it is extremely simple to spot drivers who do not move over while drivers pile up, just trying to pass them. While certainly frustrating, it is interesting that a law has been passed for this type of behavior since speeders (which are far more dangerous to other drivers) likely will get more attention. Regardless, it’s important to follow enforced laws when driving on the highway and pay attention to your role among other drivers. As an experienced  traffic and DUI lawyer in Georgia, I see many drivers involved in accidents simply for not paying attention. I recommend for this never to be the reason you are dealing with traffic trouble in court.

What do you think of the new slowpoke law? Did you even know it existed? Head over to my FacebookTwitter, or Google+ and comment to let me know. For help with your own DUI and traffic law cases, please contact me, Mickey Roberts.

Essential Tips for Encouraging Safe Teen Driving

While your teen is likely thrilled to obtain their driver’s license for the first time, it’s important to take this time to educate them on safe driving. Studies from the National Safety Council show that the most dangerous time of a teen driver‘s life is the first 12 months of having their license. In fact, this risk increases in the summer for a number of reasons.  Find out why below along with tips to help you encourage safe driving.

Essential Tips for Encouraging Safe Teen Driving

Set boundaries and curfews despite the season. While the school year is full of activities and curfews, things tend to loosen up around summer, leading to less restriction and more time out late with friends. One negative factor is that teens get less sleep, leading to more driving when tired (which some studies indicate is equally as dangerous as driving drunk). According to AAA research, the chances of being involved in a deadly crash doubles specifically for teens when driving at night, with more than half of nighttime crashes occur between 9 p.m. and midnight.

Remind them of the importance of the speed limit. While speeding in the warm summer air is tempting, one-third of all yearly traffic deaths in the U.S. are associated with driving over the speed limit. Adjusting speed for the current conditions and assuming hazards that may not be detectable yet can reduce the chance of accidents. I recommend having your teen place an object on their wrist such as a rubber band or bracelet), or on the steering wheel to remind them to look at their speedometer on a regular basis!

Put away your phone. While many parents preach the dangers of texting and driving to their teens, it isn’t convincing when you continue to use your phone yourself. It really can wait! The increase in distracted driving cases has greatly increased alongside the rise in popularity of smartphones. A common consequence of distracted driving is drifting off the side of the road or out of your lane, which causes drivers to overcorrect and in the worst of cases, flip their cars.

Take three seconds to fasten your seatbelt. This is another case of leading by example and not downplaying the importance of a seatbelt at all times. In addition to avoiding a citation, using lap/shoulder belts decreases your risk of being killed or seriously injured in a crash 45 to 50 percent.

Be open to honesty. Though the legal drinking age in Georgia is 21, it’s not uncommon for some teenagers to bend the rules. Let them know that in the event of them going against the law and drinking, it’s better to simply call for a ride than to risk getting on the road. This can not only save them from the possibility of getting a costly underage DUI, but from hurting themselves or others. Being grounded is better than being in jail, or worse.

The crash risk for young drivers’ does not begin decreasing significantly until age 25. Do your part by reminding your teen to always be mindful of driving safely. To contact a reputable lawyer in Georgia, contact me, Mickey Roberts. Be sure to follow me on FacebookTwitter, and Google+ for traffic law updates and news.

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The above information is intended to help educate members of the Georgia motoring public as to their rights under the law and to assist presumptively innocent citizens in properly asserting those rights. Information within this site should not be misconstrued as legal advice.
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