Tag Archives: traffic laws

Why the Georgia State Patrol is Asking You to Speed Up (No, Really!)

“But officer, I was going the speed limit!”

Since July 2014, this has likely been the sentiment echoing through the ears of many Georgia State Patrol officers—but not for the reason you’d expect. While many speeders wrongfully use this excuse while going well over the speed limit, it could now be due to getting pulled over due to the new “slowpoke” law.

The law was passed by state legislature in efforts to reduce the amount of drivers who obstruct the flow of traffic in the passing lane.  By doing so, officers claim to decrease the possibility of “road rage” and accidents associated with slow drivers by moving them out of the left lane away from fast moving traffic and even speeders likely to be clocked by an officer’s radar gun.

If weather or traffic conditions make it necessary to stay in the left lane or you must be in the passing lane to exit the roadway or turn left, you’ll likely be excused from having to move out of the fast lane.

As of November 2014, the Georgia State Patrol has issued well over 100 citations. Officers report that it is extremely simple to spot drivers who do not move over while drivers pile up, just trying to pass them. While certainly frustrating, it is interesting that a law has been passed for this type of behavior since speeders (which are far more dangerous to other drivers) likely will get more attention. Regardless, it’s important to follow enforced laws when driving on the highway and pay attention to your role among other drivers. As an experienced  traffic and DUI lawyer in Georgia, I see many drivers involved in accidents simply for not paying attention. I recommend for this never to be the reason you are dealing with traffic trouble in court.

What do you think of the new slowpoke law? Did you even know it existed? Head over to my FacebookTwitter, or Google+ and comment to let me know. For help with your own DUI and traffic law cases, please contact me, Mickey Roberts.

Teen Driving Under Your Influence

Recent studies show that young drivers make up the highest percentage of drivers involved in motor vehicle crashes:  the leading cause of death for U.S. teens. According to a 2010 study by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 187,000 drivers between the ages of 15 and 20 were injured in motor vehicle crashes and an additional 1,963 drivers were killed. Though, the most troubling fact is that most teenage car crashes are 100 percent preventable.

Because of driving inexperience and unsafe driving habits, teenage drivers are more prone to engage in reckless or distracted driving. Statistics show they are more likely to speed, neglect seatbelts, text, and even drink while driving. They are also unable to recognize dangerous situations or poor road conditions where these habits can contribute to serious injuries – or even death.

As a parent, it’s imperative to discuss safe driving behavior and stress these types of consequences. Here are a few topics you should be sure to discuss with your teen:

1. Cell phone use– Regardless of age or experience, cell phone use is always dangerous while driving. Talking on the phone and texting while driving are both extremely distracting for any driver because it interferes with keeping focus on the road. Teens should consider turning their cell phones off, or even storing it somewhere out of reach while they drive to avoid the temptation.

2. Limiting number of passengers– Like cell phones, friends can also be distracting for any teen driver. Statistics show that teen drivers are more likely to engage in risky driving habits with peers than when they’re alone. More passengers in a vehicle heighten the risk of distraction.

3. Seat belt use– This is something all drivers should do, not just teens. Seatbelts are the single most effective tool for saving lives and preventing injuries. Seat belts can make the difference between life and death.

4. Substance abuse– No substance abuse should be tolerated, especially for underage teens. Any amount of alcohol for an individual under 21 raises their risk of receiving a DUI in addition to jeopardizing lives. You should also discuss the risks of being a passenger in a vehicle with a driver who has been drinking or using other illegal substances.

5. Reviewing state driving laws– Discuss curfew times set by the state and the minimum number of practice hours required before getting a driver’s license. Ensure your teen fulfills all requirements and sets a foundation for safe driving. In addition to the state of Georgia’s driving laws, you should also discuss your expectations and restrictions of their driving privileges.

A parent will always worry about their teen hitting the roads for the first time, but educating them about safe habits, along with the consequences and rules of driving will help reduce the chances of an accident. Check out my website for more information on driving issues and DUI help and be sure to connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

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Disclaimer

The above information is intended to help educate members of the Georgia motoring public as to their rights under the law and to assist presumptively innocent citizens in properly asserting those rights. Information within this site should not be misconstrued as legal advice.
traffic laws